Archbishop of Canterbury presents 2018 Lambeth Awards

06/04/2018

Christians from Africa, the Far East and the UK were among the recipients of the 2018 Lambeth Awards, presented by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace today.

Christians from Africa, the Far East and the UK are among the recipients of the 2018 Lambeth Awards, which were presented by the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace today.

Among the recipients are Canon Dr Paula Gooder, who was recognised for her biblical scholarship and shining example of service to the Church of England. Canon Grace Kaiso received an award for his service to the Anglican Communion, including his remarkable leadership on conflict resolution and peacebuilding in Africa.

Meanwhile the Revd Dr John L Bell was recognised for his outstanding Christian witness through hymn-writing, broadcasting and social action.

Two Muslim leaders also received awards, including Imam Mohammed Mahmoud, who was recognised for his “courageous and selfless intervention” to prevent violence against a driver who had run down worshippers near a mosque in Finsbury Park.

In total 30 awards were given to people from across the Church who have given extraordinary service in fields including conflict resolution, education, worship, journalism and evangelism.

The Lambeth Awards, launched by Archbishop Justin Welby in 2016, recognise outstanding service in different fields, including those of the Archbishop’s ministry priorities of prayer and the Religious life; reconciliation and peacebuilding; and evangelism and witness.

Speaking at the ceremony, the Archbishop said he wished to express the thanks of the Church and the wider community for the recipients’ outstanding contributions in their fields.

He added that he hoped the world at large will “see what these people have done and understand that, in their different fields, they show forth values which are our values, Gospel values of love for humanity, reconciliation and selfless service; and, more widely, values common to all people of good will.”

Opening the ceremony, the Archbishop said:

“It is a sad fact that we live in a world where there is much cruelty and much neglect. Throughout the world – and I by no means exclude this country – it is the poorest and weakest who suffer most from the selfishness and injustice visited upon them by the rich and the strong. This is true as much in centrally-controlled economies as in those where capitalism is mistakenly worshipped as if it were a god. In addition to selfishness and injustice, there is of course physical violence, whether directed against individuals or against whole groups in society, as in civil wars and wars between states – not to mention the scourge of international terrorism. It is a gloomy picture.

“It would be easy to despair. But I do not despair. My own faith in God and in our Saviour Jesus Christ teaches me that I must be always hopeful. I must never give in to hopelessness. And one of the things which lightens my darkness is the knowledge that there are good women and men, throughout the world, who have also refused to give into despair. Good people who, often quietly, discreetly and known only to a few, work for justice and reconciliation, for the relief of poverty and for the furtherance of the Kingdom of God, for progress in education and for beauty in worship.

"I present these awards, on behalf of the Church of England and of the Anglican Communion – but also, I hope, on behalf of people of good will everywhere – for two reasons. These two reasons are distinct but complementary.

“Firstly, I want to express the thanks of the Church and of the wider community for the outstanding contributions which these people have each made in their own fields. I realise that they have not sought such an expression of thanks but that is precisely why I think it so important make this public gesture of gratitude.

“Secondly, I want the world at large to recognise and acknowledge the work of all the recipients of these awards, and to hold up these people as examples to be followed. I want others to see what these people have done and understand that, in their different fields, they show forth values which are our values, Gospel values of love for humanity, reconciliation and selfless service; and, more widely, values common to all people of good will.”

 

 

The Canterbury Cross for Services to the Church of England

The Reverend Canon Rupert Bursell QC for his contribution to the understanding and application of ecclesiastical law in the Church of England.

Canon Professor Michael Gilbert Clarke for outstanding service to church and society over many years.

The Reverend Prebendary John Collins for his outstanding record in growing churches and training evangelists and leaders.

Paula Gooder for her outstanding contribution to biblical scholarship and service to the Church of England.

Margaret Holness for sustained excellence as Education Correspondent of the Church Times for over twenty years.

Andrew Nunn for outstanding and unstinting service to the Church’s and the Archbishop’s administration for 37 years.

Mrs Rona Orme for outstanding work in the field of Christian education for children in Peterborough Diocese and beyond.

 

The Cross of St Augustine for Services to the Anglican Communion

Christine Codner, BA (Hons), MA, for 34 years’ outstanding service at the Anglican Communion Office.

The Reverend Canon Grace Clement Isabirye Kaiso – particularly as General Secretary of the Council of Anglican Provinces in Africa and his leadership on conflict resolution and peacebuilding.

The Reverend Canon Joanna Udal for her unparalleled service to the Anglican Communion.

 

The Alphege Award for Evangelism and Witness

The Reverend Janet Knox for tireless commitment and selfless dedication to mission.

The Reverend Prebendary Richard (Dick) Lucas for a lifetime of outstanding dedication to spreading the Gospel through teaching, preaching and more.

Dr Anne Richards for a lifetime of service to Christ and His people through the Church of England as policy adviser on the theology of Mission and new religious movements.

Canon Roger Simpson, Archbishop's Evangelist to the North, for his outstanding record as an evangelist both in the UK and beyond.

 

The Hubert Walter Award for Reconciliation and Interfaith Cooperation

The Right Reverend Mouneer Anis for his outstanding contribution as a catalyst for peace building, bridge-building and reconciliation between Christians and Muslims, especially in Egypt.

Imam Mohammed Mahmoud for his courageous and selfless intervention to prevent violence against a driver who had run down pedestrians near the Muslim Welfare House in Finsbury Park.

Mr Chaudry Abdul Rashid for services to the building of strong relationships between the faith communities of Birmingham and their leaders.

Paul Butler, Bishop of Durham, for his outstanding service to the church in his role as Lead Bishop on Safeguarding.

Canon Dr Andrew Smith for his outstanding contribution to interfaith relations.

 

The Lanfranc Award for Education and Scholarship

Prof. Tom McLeish FRS for his record as one of the most outstanding scientists of his generation, and the leading contemporary lay Anglican voice in the dialogue of science and faith.

The Most Reverend Dr Robert Garshong Allotey Okine for Education and Scholarship, for his outstanding contribution to education in West Africa.

 

The Langton Award for Community Service

The Reverend Elizabeth Mary Baxter MPhil for developing the counselling, healing and inclusion of those marginalised by the Church and for theological study of feminist theology, sexual identity and of related abuse, using this to provide the Church with improved understanding and inclusive liturgies.

Mrs Heather Black for her transforming effect on the Church’s community involvement across Middlesbrough.

John Kirkby for his outstanding service to the poor by equipping the local church to be at the forefront of social change through Christians Against Poverty and his own personal endeavours.

The Right Reverend Dr Alastair Redfern for national and international work in combating human trafficking and modern slavery.

 

The Thomas Cranmer Award for Worship

The Reverend Dr John L Bell for his outstanding Christian witness, through hymn-writing, broadcasting and social action.

Bernadette Farrell for her outstanding contribution to music in Christian worship.

Dr Geonyong LEE for his outstanding contribution to Korean-language Christian worship music.

 

The Lambeth Cross for Ecumenism

Dr Renier Adriaan Koegelenberg for his work through the Ecumenical Foundation of Southern Africa and beyond.

The Very Reverend John Mann for courageous and visionary leadership which affirmed diversity, fostered healing and made Belfast Cathedral a place of welcome as a sacred, civic space at the heart of a divided city.